Sentences

SENTENCE NOTES

Sentence                      A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought.

Are these sentences?

1. “Ashley walks to the park.”
2. “She takes a friend with her.”
3. “Climb a tree.”

Every sentence has a subject and a predicate. The subject usually contains the main subject or noun, and the predicate tells what the subject is doing, which contains the verb of the sentence.

 

Subject Predicate
Ashley walks to the park
She takes a friend with her
Ashley and her friend climb a tree

 

Rules for writing sentences:
1. Every sentence must begin with a capital letter.
2. Every sentence must end with a punctuation mark. You use different marks for different kinds of sentences.

Handout:   sentence journals

Run-on Sentences

There are two ways a sentence can be a run-on sentence:                          Run-On sentences are two or more sentences written                                                                                                                                                    together without any punctuation.

Comma Splices are run-on sentences that consist of two                                                                                                                                            more sentences written together and separated by only a comma.

 

There are three ways to fix run-on sentences                                1.  Use a period and create two sentences from the run-on sentence

2.   Use a semi-colon between the two sentences

3.  Use a comma and a conjunction between the two sentences.

Handouts:   sentence fragments and run-ons worksheet

Run-On Activity

 

Sentence Fragments

Sentence fragments are incomplete sentences. It is missing a subject, a predicate, or both, or

does not contain a complete thought.

To fix a sentence fragment Add the missing part of the sentence – the subject,                                                                                                            predicate, or both, or make it a complete thought

Handouts:  Sentence Fragment Activity

 

Parallelism / Parallel Structure

Parallel structure communicates ideas effectively. There are three main types: parallel words, parallel phrases, and parallel clauses. The thing to remember is that it must all match!

Parallel words: Words in a series should be either all nouns or all adjectives or all adverbs.

Incorrect: The Hollywood celebrity was charming, witty, and a beauty.

Parallel: The Hollywood celebrity was charming, witty, and beautiful.

Parallel phrases: Phrases in a series should be the same type.

Incorrect: Her aims were to study, to travel, and someday have a family.

Parallel: Her aims were to study, to travel, and someday to have a family.

Parallel clauses: All clauses in a series should be the same type.

Incorrect: What we say and the things we do are never quite the same.

Parallel: What we say and what we do are never quite the same.

 

Handouts:

Sentence Structure

Independent clause: Contains a subject and a verb and can stand alone as a sentence (it makes sense)  

Subordinate clause: Contains a subject and verb but cannot stand alone as a sentence
Simple Sentences: A simple sentence consists of one independent clause and no subordinate clauses. One                                                         subject and one predicate

Compound Sentences: A compound sentence consists of two or more independent clauses joined together with                                                         a conjunction and comma or a semi-colon.

Complex Sentences: A complex sentence consists of one independent clause and one or more                                                                                          subordinate  clause.
Compound-Complex Sentences: A compound-complex consists of two or more independent clauses and one                                                                     or  more subordinate clause.


Handouts:    Sentence Structure activity

Identify the sentence structure

Honors Sentence Structure Handout


 

 

 

 



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